Do you know ‘what’ your problem is?

The title is a little tongue in cheek, because in my experience it is the ‘what‘ that is likely your problem. We focus far to much on what we are doing both in our work and in our product, and far too little on why we are doing it.

Failing to understand the why

The obsession with local efficiency and and maximizing utilization of people is crippling customer focus and value.

There is nothing so useless as doing efficiently that which should not be done at all.

Dr Peter F. Drucker

Peter Drucker has some very inspiring quotes but that one is by far my favorite and one that I wish was better understood and adopted in practice

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We look for work to stay busy, whether it be setting up grand databases or magnificent CI solutions. I am not saying either is unnecessary, but does the solution fit the need? Were they built when needed or in anticipation of a possible future need?

The focus on lead/cycle times can result in stories becoming rushed, the focus becomes on getting work ‘done’ as quickly as possible, rather than a focus on getting the work ‘done right’. We are completing work quickly at the expense of adding value.  It also leads to ‘creative accounting’ where the desire to reduce cycle times results in the definition of done getting corrupted.

Refactoring gets sacrificed when throughput is the priority.

Stories focus on the what not the why.

We are often in such a rush to complete we either skip the why entirely or we take the easy route and look for a ‘why’ that satisfies our ‘what’  rather than actually asking why or giving it proper thought and effort into understanding the real why.

Of course the “Why conversation” can be hard, or time consuming and sometimes it seems obvious but can be hard to articulate. Story writing is a time consuming process but when the process becomes rushed there can be a tendency to prioritize stories according to what is written or what is easy to write rather than what is the next priority based on value or other prioritization methods.  We tend towards keeping people busy and the process flowing rather than ensuring we are delivering value and working on the right thing.

It is far too easy to get into a cycle of business as usual, all the time running to catch up but not really knowing if you are working on the right thing. But because everyone is busy and something is getting done “Asking why?” drops below the radar and the hard question of value does not get asked.

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Step back and evaluate if you are working on the right thing. Sometimes going slower is actually going faster.

Taking a little while to do it right could well pay dividends.  Our goal should be to give our customer the most value, not maximize how busy we are. And whilst logically these two should be related, in reality the opposite can be true.

Learning to write good stories with an emphasis on understanding the why this story adds value, learning to prioritize with the emphasis on why this story is the one we work on next can make a huge difference to a project delivery.   Incorporating story maps; road maps, story boards and utilizing other prioritization techniques can help your product deliver the right thing.

The customer should be your focus

Your product owner should be able to articulate clearly and confidently why the next story is next and that justification should be customer centric. Your goal is to make the customer happy NOT to keep your team busy.

When lead/cycle times start to become more important than refactoring it leads to a degradation of the system, either in terms of a reduction in the quality of the code, or an increase in technical debt, but more often a reduction in quality of the user experience.

UX is an afterthought

When we teach story writing we teach the INVEST method, the I is independent, and V is valuable, but I wonder if the independent is misunderstood, especially when it comes to UX.  The goal of a story is NOT to minimize Effort, it is to maximize Value. Sometimes we can maximize value by minimizing effort (ROI: Return on investment) but our goal is still the value and NOT the reduction in effort.

The goal of a story is NOT to minimize development Effort, it is to maximize customer Value

A story that adds new functionality could easily be tagged on to the existing system with little redesign of what already exists, e.g. We add a new tab or a new page or a new button, just append it to what is there. In some circumstances this may be the right outcome, but it should be a conscious decision not a default lazy way out.

A new story that is adding functionality should be assumed to be incorporating that extra functionality into the system where it fits best for the user and maintains the user experience and flow NOT where it is the easiest to integrate by the developer.  If we just tag on new functionality without consideration for the user or the existing system it can quickly become ugly and cumbersome.  Sadly the prospect of changing completed work – especially visible work can be daunting and many teams are resistant to make changes to the UI, instead preferring to add new functionality where it is least disruptive.

Each new story especially UI stories should require some reflection and a conscious decision to maintain flow and look and feel and maintaining the user experience, maintaining the user experience may very well be more valuable than the new functionality adds.

Acceptance Criteria is a substitute for thinking and conversation

We can get so focused on delivering quickly and meeting AC for a specific story that we become blinkered, we know we need to maintain quality in the sense of stability, reliability and security, but we can easily forget about the less quantifiable quality of the user experience of the system as a whole. We can seek to address the acceptance criteria without thinking whether what you are doing truly adds to the value of the product (not story) and when A/C is specific we don’t question whether it is right, we skip the conversations.

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Being busy is not your goal

It can be a very hard adjustment especially when you are paid by the hour, or even bill by the hour, for us to accept and understand that sometimes the most effective use of our time is not keeping busy. It may be to do something inefficiently or to not do anything at all.  Keeping you busy is not the goal, delivering the best product to the customer is.

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