The value of a ScrumMaster

In June 2014 a new ScrumMaster was brought in to work with an existing and established development team

At the point of joining the team had already raised concerns about environments and tools but the team had been unable to express specific issues that could be resolved, these problems had been intermittent for most of the year.   The team was composed of a BA acting as Product Owner, a Lead Engineer, three other developers and two testers with the addition of a ScrumMaster this made a team of size 8, which equates to an approximate cost to the business of around £600,000/$1,000,000 a year.

The team measure their productivity using a term called velocity, which is how much work measured using a relative scale is achieved over a period of time. The amount of work fluctuates for a variety of reasons, holidays, sickness, bugfixing, mistakes, environmental issues, focus or context switching, support requirements, spikes etc.  It is an anecdotal estimate of productivity only. But has become the industry de facto standard for measuring improvement. This had been recorded over the previous year and the documented average for the 12 months preceding the new ScrumMaster is noted below as 100 basis points per week.

Velocity can only be used to compare a team with it’s own past performance, i.e. it is a relative scale, not an absolute measure but in that context it is very useful. But should be used with caution. In this case the team had an existing Datum and a set of benchmark stories. The Datum was not modified and the benchmark stories remained in this period, thus there is a consistent base level for comparison.

Year 1 (Prior to ScrumMaster)

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The new ScrumMaster, spent some time with the team, observing and evaluating. He sought to identify problem areas and any behaviour in the team where improvements could be made. But unlike a conventional manager or trouble-shooter he did not issue directives on changes to behaviour.

The team scheduled regular ‘retrospective’ meetings where they review the past time period and look for ways to improve.  The ScrumMaster used a variety of techniques, to coach and guide the team to focus on areas identified either by the team or by the ScrumMaster as problematic or where improvement could be made. The ScrumMaster collected and compiled metrics to aid this analysis, and facilitated meetings to be productive in deconstructing problems in a non-negative manner.

By using this approach the ScrumMaster did not solve the teams problems, he did not offer ‘his’ solution to the team, nor issue directives for improvement. The ScrumMaster worked with the team to enable them to become aware of their problems and the ScrumMaster created an environment where the team were empowered to solve their own problems. The ScrumMaster uses his past experience to identify problems and may steer the team to suitable solutions, but relies on the team to solve their own problems.

In the following quarter there was a notable upturn in velocity (productivity)

Year 2 (First quarter after ScrumMaster)

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The ScrumMaster is responsible for creating an environment where the team can reach a long-term and consistent performance – a spike or a blip is not considered sustainable, so it is important to not seek to boost productivity with short-term fixes like overtime or cutting quality. The aim is sustainable pace and sustainable quality over the long-term.

The ScrumMaster continued to work with the team identifying more bottle-necks and waste, removing impediments and coaching the team how to work around impediments or resolve them themselves, there is always room for improvement in a team.

The ScrumMaster also spent time coaching the Product Owner and Programme Manager on expectations and in their interactions with the Scrum Team, including challenging the Programme Manager on how his priorities are fed to the team so that the team could focus to be more effective.

Year 2 (First full year with new ScrumMaster)

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Velocity is only one measure of productivity and is largely anecdotal, however it is the only real measure we currently have available.  The productivity improvement should be considered in that context. However, there is a clear and notable improvement in the productivity of the team over the 12 month period.  The team deserves the credit for the improvement as they have improved themselves.  But by adding an experienced ScrumMaster to an existing team he has been able to coach the team into identifying ways they could improve and in doing so doubling their productivity – a significant change in just 1 year.  In this instance it could be argued that the ScrumMaster’s coaching of this one team has resulted in £600,000/$1,000,000 worth of added value to the business and assuming the team does not regress this is an ongoing year on year gain. 

It is not often possible to measure the impact on a team, and velocity is a fragile tool for that, but I hope it is clear from these metrics the value that one person can have on a team.  It is highly likely that Year 3 will not have the same growth but even if the new velocity can be merely sustained the value to the organisation is significant.

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